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GIWS and Environment Canada to host severe weather safety training

Event aims to show how to use clouds and other features to identify thunderstorm types and associated severe weather

Summer storms can happen quickly, and heavy rains, wind and lightning pose a serious safety concern for anyone who is caught in the middle of severe bouts of weather.

But staying safe is more than just watching the forecast, according to John Paul Cragg, warning preparedness meteorologist with Environment and Climate Change Canada.

“Understanding visual cues and being about to identify around you is one of the most important ways you can avoid harm in a storm,” says Cragg.

Cragg, along with SENS/GIWS faculty, will give a presentation on summer severe weather safety and spotting on Tuesday, June 21 between 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the main floor seminar room of 11 Innovation Blvd.

This presentation could especially be of interest to people who spend time in the field during the summer months as it can help prepare staff to spot active weather and respond appropriately, said Cragg.

Topics include:

• A brief overview of the meteorological processes associated with summer severe weather

• Different types of thunderstorms and what storms are the most dangerous

• How to use clouds and other features to identify thunderstorm types and associated severe weather

• How to stay safe during summer severe weather and how to effectively use Environment Canada’s Watches and Warnings

• How reporting information on severe weather can help to keep people safe

• Developing an application tool that allows people to provide geo-located photos of severe weather in real time

• Discussion of Long Term Goals: Improving Environment Canada’s Watches and Warnings through complimentary crowd sourcing of on the ground weather information

For more information please contact John Paul Cragg at John.Cragg@Canada.ca or at 306-975-6911 or Graham Strickert at graham.strickert@usask.ca.

Please join us:  Tuesday, June 21st, 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. National Hydrology Research Centre, 11 Innovation Blvd.

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